The Testing Process

At present, you can get a 12, 37, 67, or 111-marker Y-DNA test from Family Tree DNA. We recommend at least the 37-marker test to start. The 111-marker test would be best; however, cost may be a factor, and there is currently little utility in going beyond 67 markers, which is the test we recommend. The 25-marker test would be acceptable, but they seem to have discontinued it. Buying one test plus an upgrade is more expensive than buying all markers at once. There may be times that we will ask for upgrades to 67 or 111 markers to better understand the DNA results. Alhough there is a cheaper 12 marker test, we do not recommend it, as about the only thing it will tell you is whether or not you are (possibly) a descendant of Somerled. Upgrades can easily be done from your personal page at Family Tree DNA and does not require another DNA sample from you – they will use the sample you originally submitted.

Signing up for the testing is simple.

Simply go to the Donald USA surname project page at www.familytreedna.com

and select a test, preferably 37 or more markers. Then go to the next page and fill out the form and you will have a kit mailed to you. Collecting the DNA sample is painless – you take a scraping from the inside of your mouth. You send the kit and about six weeks later you will learn the results. As the Surname Group Administrators, we will also learn the results. (This will allow us to start sorting out the Donald lines). The costs are in the $100-300 range. Family Tree DNA takes credit cards.

We can also accept results from other testing companies. Collectively our display charts created by Professor Doug now show over 120 markers. These additional markers are optional and you should discuss them with Mark or Doug before ordering them.

In addition, various project members have participated in SNP testing to attempt to determine whether there are deep mutations within the large R1b group to establish deep divisions within the data. Once you have tested with FTDNA and find you are R1b you may contact us to determine which SNP tests would be useful.

Among the purposes of this genetic study was not simply to identify modern cousins but also to learn more about us as a clan. What portion of our ancestry was Viking? What portion of our ancestry was Gael? Was descended from Colla? Was paternally descended from Conn or Neill? Were there answers to the historical questions posed above in the genetic data?

The writing of history involves the use of incomplete scraps of data to tell a coherent story. In that way it is not so different from the interpretation of genealogical information. Indeed, Celtic culture saw no distinction between the two roles. The seanachie was both the keeper of history and the keeper of genealogies. What portion of the stories and available information can be reinterpreted in light of newly available genetic information? In fact we already have an answer to these questions, and it is “quite a lot”.

Contact Information

Mark MacDonald

email:     mark@macdonaldlaw.com

U. S. Mail:

Mark MacDonald
9938 Ontario
Dallas TX 75220

J. Douglas McDonald

email:     jdmcdona@illinois.edu

U. S. Mail:

J. D. McDonald
1105 Baytowne Dr. #23
Champaign IL 61822